David Wagner - New England Historical Artist

 

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Series (W3R)

All original paintings in the Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route series are available for sale individually. The works depicted here are entirely a private endeavor by the artist. Interested parties should contact the artist directly by e-mail or by phone at 860-933-0501. Although we do our best to keep this web site updated, please contact the artist directly to inquire about a painting's availability. Additional works from the series are forthcoming and will be posted as completed.

Duplicate paintings of any pieces marked as "SOLD" can be re-commissioned by contacting the artist directly by e-mail or by phone at 860-933-0501.

Reproductions of David R. Wagner's original paintings representing events along the Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route are available as fine art, limited-edition, signed and numbered giclée reproductions and as archival quality prints. Please visit our How To Order page for more information.

Folio prints (laser prints; 11x14) for the Revolutionary Route Series and the Native American Series are also available. Please visit our How To Order page for more information.


SOME OF THE MAIN PLAYERS
IN THE FRENCH ALLIANCE
L-R, top:
Washington  16x20/Giclée 11x14
Rochambeau  16x20/Giclée 11x14
DeViomenil  16x20/Giclée 11x14

L-R, bottom:
Chastelleux  16x20
DeGrasse  16x20/Giclée 11x14

Some of the Main Players in the French Alliance

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Rhode Island
FIRST ANCHORAGE
36x36
Giclée  14.5x14.5
This depicts the first anchorage by the French fleet under Admiral DeTarney, which was carrying all of General Rochambeau's troops. After 77 days crossing from Brest, France, several encounters with British warships around Chesapeake Bay, and skirting the coast north in very heavy fog, the 54-ship convoy anchored off Martha's Vineyard and secured the services of three pilots who could navigate the Bay and Newport harbor. DeTarney's fleet consisted of seven ships of the line, three frigates, a supply transport, which served as a hospital ship, and thirty-two transports, which carried the bulk of Rochambeau's army numbering near 5,000. The crossing left over 800 sick among the land troops, and some 1,500 in the fleet. Most were down with scurvy.

First Anchorage

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Rhode Island
DISEMBARKING
JULY 11, 1778
36x48
Giclée  19.4x14.5
Four days after the arrival of the fleet at Newport on July 11, all of Rochambeau's troops left the ships and set up camp in and around Newport. Most stayed in tents and later in homes they repaired after the British occupation in 1778. The troops were complemented by a contingent of American troops under the command of General Heath, who had been so ordered by General Washington. Troops from Massachusetts and Rhode Island made up the force, although it is doubtful that many troops were raised. The Rhode Island Regiment is mentioned in many French journals as being among the best troops in the American Army.

Disembarking

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Rhode Island
BRITISH PANIC ON THE SAKONNET
JULY 12, 1778
36x48
Giclée  14.5x19.3
On July 12, 1778, as part of the Battle of Rhode Island, Pierre Andre de Suffren de Saint Topez, a French Admiral who would later become a brilliant naval commander, sailed two French frigates into the Sakonnet River and threw the British fleet into a panic. Six British ships ran aground, and went up in smoke, flame and exploding powder. Thus the British were trapped by Suffren and were forced to suffer severe losses. Although the Battle of Rhode Island was thought not to be successful as the British were not driven out of Newport, a number of actions, including Suffren's bold strike into the Sakonnet, did produce significant results in the war effort against the British.

British Panic on the Sakonnet

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Rhode Island
THE BATTLE OF RHODE ISLAND
AUGUST 28, 1778
36x48
Sold to Private Party
Giclée  18.65x14.5
This painting, entitled "Desperate Valor," shows the newly formed regiment in action against the Anspach Regiment in the Newport/Portsmouth area on August 28, 1778. This regiment turned back three attempts of the British to break their line. The delay allowed General Sullivan to escape to the mainland while these troops defended and held off the British advance. The biographer for General Sullivan recorded their action by this entry: "The black troops under Col. Christopher Green displayed desperate valor by holding off three attempts by Hussein troops to break their line."

The Battle of Rhode Island

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Rhode Island
BRILLIANTLY ILLUMINATED
JULY 1780
36x48
Giclée  19.25x14.5
In July of 1780, a few days after the arrival of the French Fleet in Newport, the Selectmen of the town issued candles to the residents so that all the houses and churches of Newport might be illuminated as a welcome to the French. This brilliant display was repeated in March of 1781 during Washington's visit to Newport. According to The Mercury, the local newspaper of the time, both the town and the fleet were "brilliantly illuminated."

Brilliantly Illuminated

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Rhode Island
THE QUESTION
AUGUST 28, 1780
36x48
Giclée 19.25x14.5
On August 28, 1780 and a month after the French army had settled into camp around Newport, a delegation of Oneida Indians from upstate New York visited General Rochambeau at Newport. They were received with much distinction. They asked to hear Mass, after which they were entertained by Rochambeau and given dinner. During the entertainment, one of the chiefs asked a question that the general could not answer: "How is it that the King of France, our father, sends his troops to protect the Americans against the King of England, their father?"

The Question

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Rhode Island
OVERVIEW OF ENCAMPMENTS AT PROVIDENCE
JUNE 1781
36x36
Giclée 14.5x14.5
This overview shows the original French engineering map of the layout of the three French encampments around Providence in June of 1781 as the army prepared to move south. The aerial view shows the same encampment, but in a clearer view than the French map, allowing the site to be located along various roads and streets in present-day Providence. The flags in the upper right corner represent each regiment involved. Providence was the main camp in which all the French units were encamped in three separate areas as shown.

Overview of Encampments at Providence

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Rhode Island
THE GRAND PARADE IN PROVIDENCE
36x60
Sold to Former Governor Bruce Sundlun
Giclée  20x11.9
A day before departure south, the French and American forces held a parade through the streets of Providence. Shown here is the American unit of the First Rhode Island being reviewed by General Rochambeau atop his horse. His aide-de-camp, the Baron Ludwig Von Closen, also mounted, recorded in his journal that none of the American units could compare to the spit and polish of the French army except the First Rhode Island, "and that regiment, which is three quarters negro and the rest native american, is the best dressed, the best under arms, and the most precise in its maneuvers."

The Grand Parade in Providence

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Rhode Island
OVERVIEW OF FIRST ENCAMPMENT
AT WATERMAN'S TAVERN
36x48
Giclée 14.5x14.5
This overview shows the first encampment of the French army in Scituate, Rhode Island along the Plainfield Pike. The distance from the main camp was 18 miles. The Tavern still stands today in that section of Scituate known as Pottersville. The camp was located directly across the street from the Tavern and was occupied for four days. As one regiment would leave for the next camp in Plainfield, another would take its place until the fourth regiment left. Most of the officers, including Rochambeau, stayed at the tavern with the majority of the foot soldiers pitching tents for the one-night stay. This camp was reused on the army's return in 1783 once the conflict with England was over.

Overview of First Encampment at Waterman's Tavern

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Rhode Island
WATERMAN'S TAVERN
36x48
Giclée  19.2x14.5
This was the first stop for the French army after leaving the Providence encampment. The scene shows army units preparing to leave while the tavern keeper and his wife bid farewell to Rochambeau.

Waterman's Tavern

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Rhode Island
TRAIN OF ARTILLERY ON ROUTE 14
36x48
Giclée  19.25x14.5
Each of the four regiments had a train of artillery comprised of about a dozen cannon of various sizes. This was a part of the total of nearly fifty pieces for the whole army. The artillery shown here is arriving in the early morning at one of the encampments. It always arrived either very late or very early in the morning because of very bad roads and breakdown of the gun carriages. In addition to the soldiers who operated the guns, it carried about fifteen members of foresters and engineers who cut branches, downed trees, and filled potholes. Every few miles the axles had to be packed with grease, mostly lard, for lubrication.

Train of Artillery on Route 14

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Rhode Island
THE LEGEND OF BISCUIT HILL
36x36
Giclée  14.5x14.5
One of the many fascinating stories connected with the movement of Rochambeau's 5,000 troops were events, encounters, and adventures that occurred aside from the great battles that took place. Along a section of Route 14 near what is called Rice City, one of the 300 wagons which moved supplies and equipment broke down, breaking an axle and dumping its contents all over the road. As the area was suffering its third year of drought and flour was in short supply, the French soldiers allowed nearby townspeople to collect most of the spilled biscuits that had been baked at Providence the day before. The area was henceforth called "Biscuit Hill," and a country lane nearby is still called Biscuit Hill Road.

The Legend of Biscuit Hill

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Connecticut
OVERVIEW OF SECOND CAMP AT PLAINFIELD
36x36
Giclée  14.5x14.5
This overview shows the second French camp at Plainfield, fifteen miles from Waterman's Tavern in Scituate. The roads were very bad and full of boulders and holes, with breakdowns frequent, delaying arrival by many hours. When the troops arrived in Plainfield they were cheered by townspeople, and in the evening the French band played various tunes, to which everyone danced.

Overview of Second Camp at Plainfield

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Connecticut
THE MEETING AT FERRY CROSSING
36x48
Giclée  19.4x14.5
This scene, although happening along the Connecticut River in East Hartford, shows a detachment of mounted troops of the first Rhode Island. The group provided escort for the Marquis de Chastelleux, a Major General under General Rochambeau. His diary entry reads as follows, "the fifth I did not set out until eleven, although I had a thirty mile journey to Lebanon. At the ferry crossing I met a detachment of the first Rhode Island regiment, the same corps we had with us all last summer, but have since been recruited and clothed. The majority of the enlisted men are Negroes or mulattos, but they are strong, robust men and those I saw made a very good appearance. I had fine weather all day and got to Lebanon at sunset." Not only were these troops black, but they were mounted, a factor not before mentioned in any text.

The Meeting at Ferry Crossing

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Connecticut
THE SCOTLAND INCIDENT
SEPTEMBER 21, 1780
36x36
Giclée  14.5x14.5
Washington arrived at the conference in Weathersfield on the 21st of September and was late. Under ordinary circumstances, he would have made the journey on horseback; but Admiral DeTernay was sick and a coach had been provided for his convenience. A broken axle in Scotland, Connecticut necessitated a wheelwright; but when one was finally located, he turned out to be suffering from fever. The wheelwright stated that he would not leave his bed for a hatful of Guineas. With the help of Admiral DeTernay, Fersen convinced the shivering wheelwright to change his mind. The axle was repaired and the French party reached the conference without further mishap. However, on the way home, the axle broke again and again the village smithy had to be summoned from his bed. The white house seen in the background is the birthplace of Samuel Huntington, signer of the Declaration of Independence. This house still stands today along the same route over which Rochambeau's army marched.

The Scotland Incident

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Connecticut
SQUIRREL HUNT
JANUARY 1781
36x48
Giclée  19.4x14.5
The Marquis de Chastelleux (in red cape) and the Duke de Luzon return from a squirrel hunt in Lebanon, Connecticut. The building in the background is the Redwood House, which served as the headquarters for Luzon's legion during the winter of 1781.

Squirrel Hunt

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Rhode Island
THE FRENCH FLEET AT NEWPORT
SPRING 1781
30x48
Giclée  30x12
A view of the town of Newport and the arrangement of the combined French fleet in the spring of 1781, just prior to the army's march south to Yorktown. It was in position in and around Newport Harbor covering cannon, on shore and on ship, at all entry points to the bay. Admiral De Turney died on December 11, 1780 and was eventually replaced by Admiral DeBarras. This shows the combined French fleet in late spring of 1781, when additional vessels joined the fleet. Seen in the foreground are the land emplacements of cannon facing the channel. The view, looking north and east, shows Newport as it appeared at the time, with some of these same buildings -- the churches and Newport Tower -- still standing today.

The French Fleet at Newport, 1781

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Rhode Island
LITTLE REST
MARCH 6, 1781
36x48
Giclée  19.4x14.5
This scene shows the arrival of General Washington at Little Rest, or Kingston, Rhode Island on the 6th of March, 1781 to meet with General Rochambeau at Newport. At Little Rest was a detachment of French mounted troops called "Hussars" who were part of the mounted division under the Duke de Luzon stationed at Lebanon, Connecticut. This unit was part of the relay team set up between Rochambeau and Luzun for communications, eight in number and placed out about every twenty miles for that purpose. Washington stayed the night at Kingston and arrived at Newport the next day.

Little Rest

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Rhode Island
NAVAL WELCOME
MARCH 1781
36x48
Giclée  19.4x14.5
After spending the night at Little Rest, Washington is welcomed aboard the 80-gun flagship of the French fleet by the Duc de Bourgogne. Washington tours the great ship, greeting the French officers and enlisted men in their best dress uniforms. Meanwhile, with flags and banners waving, the entire squadron fires broadsides in Washington's honor. The combined cannon fire was so great and so continuous that, according to a Newport resident, "the earth trembled, and the bay seemed to be on fire."

Naval Welcome

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Rhode Island
ARRIVAL AT NEWPORT
MARCH 1781
36x48
Giclée  19.5x14.5
Washington came ashore and was greeted by Rochambeau's land troops, standing several ranks deep on each side of the street all the way to the Colony House. As Washington passed by on his mile-long trek to the Colony House, cannon from the ships kept up a continuous salute and the troops came to attention, rank by rank. At the steps of the Colony House, he was greeted by Rochambeau and escorted to the Vernon House, where he would stay for nearly a week.

Arrival at Newport

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Rhode Island
THE GREAT BALL
36x48
Giclée  19.4x14.5
On the evening of Washington's arrival, a great ball was held in his honor at Mrs. Crowley's Assembly Hall. The hall had been decorated with regimental flags, dress swords and pistols, and a civilian orchestra had been hired to provide music for the event. Soon after the ball was underway, Rochambeau expressed great displeasure in their musical abilities and promptly fired the entire ensemble. He called for any officers who could play an instrument to come forward, took up the conductor's baton, and conducted the group well into the night.

The Great Ball

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Rhode Island
REVIEW OF THE FRENCH FLEET
36x48
Giclée  14.5x19.6
Washington and Rochambeau review the passing of the French fleet from the East Passage in Newport in March 1781. The fleet returned three weeks later after having engaged the English fleets. They suffered 80 killed and 120 wounded.

Review of the French Fleet

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Connecticut
DIFFICULT DUTY
APRIL 1781
36x48
Giclée  19.1x14.5
The first Frenchman to die for desertion were Corporals Christopher Hand and Joseph Frank, executed by firing squad in Lebanon, Connecticut in late April of 1781. It is mentioned in several reports that one of the soldiers overstayed his leave in the arms of a local girl. The name of the girl is also mentioned; but records indicate she did not come from Lebanon. It is also said that a petition to pardon him was sent to Gen. Rochambeau at Newport some 60 miles away, and that he granted the pardon; but by the time word reached Lebanon, the soldier had already been shot.

Difficult Duty

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New York
DEATH OF COL. CHRISTOPHER GREENE
MAY 14, 1781
36x48
Sold to Hudson River Valley Institute as part of Dr. Frank P. Bumpus Collection
Giclée  19.5x14.5
In the early morning hours of May 14, 1781, a Tory unit operating in Westchester County under the command of Col. DeLancy was under orders to take Col. Greene dead or alive. With 60 horse and 200 troops, they assaulted Greene's camp and the house being used as headquarters. Before Greene could dress and leave his bedroom, he was cut to pieces by the Tory forces. Greene's Black Regiment put up fierce resistance, but were unable to prevent the Tory Loyalists from taking the mortally-wounded Greene on the road back to their headquarters. The Black Regiment pursued and, in what was later called the Battle of Pine Bridge in Croton, NY, managed to wrest Greene back from the Loyalists. The Black Regiment suffered 44 killed or wounded during the battle.

Death of Col. Christopher Greene

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Connecticut
LEAVING LEBANON
JUNE 21, 1781
30x36
Giclée  12.5x20
Lauzun's Legion was the only horse unit under the army of General Rochambeau to serve in America, and arrived with the fleet in July 1780 at Newport. It consisted of 230 mounted Huzzars and 300 light infantry troops. Due to the lack of forage for the horses in and around Newport, arrangements were made to have the Legion spend the winter of 1780-81 in Lebanon, Connecticut, some 60 miles from Newport. They left Newport on November 10, 1780 for Lebanon. Upon their arrival, barracks were constructed and the troops settled in for the winter. Lauzun, a French nobleman, called Lebanon "The Siberia of North America" and preferred the atmosphere and activities around Newport. The Legion moved out in force on June 21m 1781 and would join the main army in Phillipsburg, New York on July 2, 1781. It took part in the defeat of British forces at Yorktown on October 17, 1781.

Many local stories are connected with the Legion's stay in Lebanon. One observation was made by Mary Williams, second daughter of Governor Trumbull, two weeks before their departure. She wrote, "Oh, how glad and how thankful I shall be when they are gone, for never was I so sick of any people in my life. Joy go long with them and wish never to see another French man in my life and best of them are nothing but pride and vanity."

It was recently determined that the mounted troops wore the red pants of the First Division, not the yellow as shown. This change is reflected in the "Sabre au Clair" painting.

Leaving Lebanon

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Rhode Island
THE SILVER SPOON
JULY 1781
36x30
Giclée 14.5x19.5
Sometime in early July of 1781, General Rochambeau gave Sara Bowen, wife of the late Lt. Governor of Rhode Island, a silver serving spoon manufactured in England. The gift was in appreciation for allowing the General and his staff to utilize the residence as his Providence headquarters. Many of the French officers and Gen. Washington spent several nights there at different times. It was the very place Rochambeau bid farewell to his troops in December of 1782 before returning to France.

The Silver Spoon

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New York
FIRST AMPHIBIOUS OPERATION  AGAINST THE ENGLISH
JULY 12, 1781
36x48
Sold to Hudson River Valley Institute as part of Dr. Frank P. Bumpus Collection
Giclée  19.5x14.5
On July 12, 1781 some 500 troops, originally left with the fleet at Newport as the main army began its march south, took part in the first actual contact with British forces at Fort Franklin on Lloyd's Point in Huntington, Long Island, New York. The force was to burn supplies stored there, as defenders were thought to be few. However, the fort was heavily armed and a number of cannon started to shell the French units preparing for the assault. Although the French far outnumbered the British, it was decided only to make a token exchange and then withdraw. It appears it was to be a feint, in that Washington's plan was to convince the British in New York that the combined French-American forces would next strike there. Washington and Rochambeau were already in the process of moving south to eventually engage Cornwallis at Yorktown.

First Amphibious Operation Against the English

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New York
SOISSONNAIS REGIMENT
JULY 16, 1781
36x60
Sold to Hudson River Valley Institute as part of Dr. Frank P. Bumpus Collection
Giclée  20x12
A small detachment of the Soissonnais Regiment prevented the British from landing to burn the stores at Tarrytown, New York. The Americans under Shelton arrived later.

Soissonnais Regiment

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Pennsylvania
ROCHAMBEAU VISITS FT. MIFFLIN
ON HIS WAY TO YORKTOWN
SUMMER 1781
36x48
SOLD to Ft. Mifflin Park Board of Directors
Giclée  14.5x19.6
A short distance south of Philadelphia, on the Delaware, was a small fort which saw much activity prior to the British taking Philadelphia. The fort held out for a number of months, taking over 10,000 cannonballs in a 24-hour period. Rochambeau inspected the fort in the summer of 1781, just a few months prior to the victory at Yorktown.

Rochambeau Visits Ft. Mifflin on His Way to Yorktown

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New Jersey
MOVING ACROSS NEW JERSEY
AUGUST 25, 1781
30x36
Giclée  12.9x20
Shown here is the Lauzon Legion together with the Rhode Island Regiment as they guarded Washington's 2nd Division from the Hudson south to Yorktown. It is the only time that American units and French units actually served together in a joint operation. This occurred along present-day Route 202 in what is now Oakland, New Jersey. The house is the Van Allen House, which served as Washington's headquarters on July 14 &15 in 1777. The 2nd Division was composed of over 500 wagons of supplies needed to sustain other armies.

Moving Across New Jersey

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New Jersey
CADILLAC SPRING, MAHWAY, NJ
36x36
Giclée  14.5x14.5
According to oral tradition, Cadillac Spring was utilized by French and American forces during their march south to Yorktown. Water was as important as food, and only spring or well sources did not require a portion of rum to be added before it could be consumed. All other sources did; this treated the water for possible bacteria or other diseases that might be found. Natural springs were sought out as wells ran dry before a regiment could gain its fill. This scene shows French troops of the Bourbonnais Regiment filling canteens with water from the spring. Henrid Souffle, executive chef to Gen. Rochambeau, looking into the spring saw a large bull frog that had been known to keep the spring clean. The French like frog legs and must have abducted the large frog, as it was never seen again after that day. The spring is still visible today along a portion of Rt. 202 in the Rampo Valley.

Cadillac Spring, New Jersey

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New Jersey
CHATHAM OVENS, NEW JERSEY
36x48
Giclée  19.5x14.5
Originally built by French engineers in 1781 at Chatham, New Jersey to create a diversion so that the American and French forces could make their way south to Yorktown while the British expected an attack on New York. Although the ovens were used to bake bread, their essential purpose was to convey to the English that an attack was planned against New York City, and that the allies would not construct such a massive oven complex unless an assault against New York were imminent. The ploy worked and, by the time the English heard of the movment of troops against Cornwallis, it was too late to intercept them.

Chatham Ovens

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Washington, DC
CROSSING AT ROCK CREEK
Rock Creek/Potomac Parkway
36x48
Giclée  14.5x20.5
The road occupies the approximate site of the Colonial era ford used by the Baltimore Light Dagroons, the French Army under Rochambeau and the Duc de Lauzun in 1781. "Once while the French soldiers were crossiing Rock Creek at this 'P' street ford, a wagon loaded with French specie, composed of gold and silver coins, turned over as it was going down a very steep part of the road to the ford crossing below. Much of the gold and silver coin poured out on the open ground." The second wagon seen in the painting is starting to pitch over. Lauzun's Legion and a contingent of the 1st Rhode Island were ordered to escort the second division by Washington.
From the Columbia Historical Society, Vol 52-56, p. 129.

Crossing at Rock Creek

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Connecticut
SUPPLY DEPOT AT DANBURY, CT
AUGUST 1781
36x48
Giclée  19.5x14.5
The supply depot as it might have appeared at Danbury, Connecticut during August 1781. The depot supplied many  of the needs of both Washington's troops and Rochambeau's army just prior to their move across the Hudson River south to Yorktown, Virginia. As the British burned Danbury, leaving few structures standing, the Americans took over the Episcopal Church as a warehouse to store supplies as an affront to the British.

Supply Depot at Danbury, CT

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Delaware
ALONG THE BALTIMORE PIKE IN DELAWARE
AUGUST 1781
30x36
Seen here is Lauzon's Legion camped along the pike in Delaware. The old mill house is still standing today and the fields around the stream remain open. The availability of water for the over 220 horses was essential to any area chosen as a camp.

Along the Baltimore Pike in Delaware

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Maryland
ARRIVAL of THE ROYAL DEUX PONTS REGIMENT IN BALTIMORE
36x48
Giclée  19x14.5
The regiment arrives in Baltimore in August of 1781. The brick building still stands and is surrounded by buildings that make up the city today. It was originally built as a Quaker meeting house and still remains that to this day. Major General Baron de Vioménil is seen reviewing the troops as he is in charge while Gen. Rochambeau is on his way to Mt. Vernon to meet with Washington for a few days.

Entering Baltimore

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Connecticut
THE BATTLE OF GROTON HEIGHTS
SEPTEMBER 6, 1781
36x60
SOLD to City of Groton, CT
Giclée  12x22
The aftermath of the attack by British troops, led by Benedict Arnold, and the burning of New London. Col. Ledyard and his men were massacred by the British; Ledyard was run through while handing his sword in surrender to the British Commander.
Mural 12 ft. x 24 ft.

This mural is displayed in the Groton City Hall Building in Groton, Connecticut. It is the largest work accomplished by the artist to date.

The Battle of Groton Heights

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Virginia
RELAXING MOMENT
SEPTEMBER 9, 1781
36x36
Giclée  14.5x14.5
On September 9, 1781, Washington reached Mount Vernon following a six year absence. Within 24 hours he was followed by Rochambeau, Chastelleux and staff. They stayed one day and two nights. Shown here are the two generals relaxing for a short time, soon to be on their way to Williamsburg and the victory at Yorktown.

Relaxing Moment

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Virginia
FIRST OFFICIAL USE OF MT. VERNON'S LARGE DINING ROOM
SEPTEMBER 11, 1781
36x48
Giclée  19.6x14.5
On September 11, 1781, General Rochambeau, Marquis de Chastelleux, and the necessary entourage, aides de camp and bodyguards, arrived at Mt. Vernon, spending two nights and one day there before moving on to Williamsburg and the final battle with Cornwallis at Yorktown. The large dining room was unfinished, but was the only room big enough to accommodate the combined parties. So a makeshift table was set up on sawhorses and planks to serve as a buffet. The ceiling and moldings were uncompleted, but the large space proved adequate to the task. Washington and Rochambeau left for Williamsburg early the next morning.

First Official Use of Mt. Vernon's Large Dining Room

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Connecticut
FAITH TRUMBULL DONATES HER CAPE
36x48
Sold to Private Party
Although not supported by any hard data, much like the story of Biscuit Hill in Rhode Island, oral tradition states that one Sunday in Lebanon, Connecticut a collection was being made at church for the troops in the field who were in need of clothes, blankets and other necessities. Faith Trumbull, the Governor's wife, donated to the cause a red cape that had been given to her by General Rochambeau. The rich garment was later cut into strips for rank markings and other needs.

Faith Trumbull Donates Her Cape

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Connecticut
CARLTON'S BRIDGE
36x48
Giclée  19.5x14.5
General Rochambeau and a group of French engineers inspect Carlton's Bridge on the Housatonic River. After a few hours rest, Clermont-Crevecoeur and his artillery marched toward Newton via Woodbury and Southbury. They crossed the Housatonic River, called "Stratford" or "Little Stratford" by the French, "on a bridge which is remarkably constructed, in that the timber work is supported without pillars, by the thrust of intersecting arches."

Carlton's Bridge

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Maryland
OVERNIGHT AT PORT TOBACCO
SEPTEMBER 14, 1781
36x48
Commissioned by local W3R group headed by Ernest Irish of La Plata, Maryland.
On September 14, 1781, the Comte du Bourg (left) and Baron von Closen stayed overnight at Port Tobacco, Maryland on their way to Yorktown. They both wear uniforms of aide-de-camp to General Rochambeau. They took part in the final surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown.

Overnight at Port Tobacco

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Virginia
THE SEAWELL INCIDENT
OCTOBER 3, 1781
36x48
Giclée  19.7x14.5
Elizabeth Seawell Whiting, the widow of the Commissioner of the Navy (much his younger), was mentioned by both Tarleton and Lauzun in their memoirs. On October 3, 1781, when Lauzun asked her if she had seen "the Brits" (Tarleton), she replied, "Colonel Tarleton has just left here and mentioned that he was anxious to shake hands with the French Duc." The Battle of the Hook took place a short time later on the Gloucester side of the York River, during which Tarleton was wounded and forced to withdraw.

The Seawell Incident

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Virginia
SABRE AU CLAIR
OCTOBER 3, 1781
36x48
Giclée  20x12.3
The flanking charge of Lauzun's Legion during The Battle of the Hook on October 3, 1781 at Gloucester Point, Virginia.

It was recently determined that the mounted troops wore the red pants of the First Division, not the yellow as shown in the "Leaving Lebanon" scene. This change is reflected in this "Sabre au Clair" painting.

Sabre au Clair

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Virginia
VIRGINIA MILITIA BATTLE TARLTON
OCTOBER 3, 1781
36x60
Giclée  20x12
On October 3, 1781, Lauzun's legion clashed with British forces headed by Tarlton. The battle took place across from Yorktown on the Gloucester side of the York River. After a protracted engagement, in which the Virginia Militia were involved, the forces under Tarlton were forced to withdraw. It was a preview of the surrender of Cornwallis just 14 days later, bringing the war to an unofficial end.

Virginia Militia Battle Tarlton

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Virginia
AT THE FERRY CROSSING AT GEORGETOWN, VA
OCTOBER 10, 1781
36x48
Giclée  18.75x14.5
On the 10th of October, 1781 Washington was on his way to visit Mt. Vernon for the first time in six years. He was followed the next day by Rochambeau, Chastelleux and their staff. This scene shows Washington boarding the Potomac River ferry at Georgetown, Virginia with his Life Guard and French Aid-de-Camps.

At The Ferry Crossing - Georgetown, VA

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Virginia
NIGHT ASSAULT BY FRENCH TROOPS
OCTOBER 14, 1781
36x48
Giclée  19.7x14.5
On the night of October 14, 1781, attacks against Redoubt #9 and Redoubt #10 were ordered. The assault on Redoubt #9 was a French undertaking, with American forces assaulting Redoubt #10. The French Royal Deux Ponts and Gatenois Regiments took on the Hessian Erbprinz Regiment. Because it was dark, and both the French and Hessian troops wore dark blue coats, many were killed by "friendly fire" as they could not be easily identified as friend or foe.

Night Assault By French Troops

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Virginia
ASSAULT ON REDOUBT #10
OCTOBER 14, 1781
Yorktown, VA
36x48
Giclée  12.5x20
Although the Rhode Island Regiment was consolidated into a single unit in May 1781, the contingent of black troops was still called the "1st Rhode Island" and were commonly referred to as "Olney's Batallion." After dark on October 14, 1781, three days before the surrender of Cornwallis, the column moved forward in silence, muskets unloaded, bayonets fixed, in good order. Leading were eight pioneers with axes with the forlorn hope to be first through the cleared breach. With one man per company, then Col. Gimete (French officer) with five young officers in advance; next was Olney's Company and then the rest of the force. "When we came under the first of the abattis (logs and brush), the enemy fired a volley of musketry. The British continued to shoot, but aimed high. The pioneers then cut through the abattis. Olney moved past them, climbed the outer wall of the Redoubt, stepped on to the parapet between the two palisades. Twelve of his men followed closley. He called out, "Capt. Olney's company, form here."  Six or eight British bayonets pushed at him. Some scaled his fingers, one pierced his thigh, another stabbed him in the abdomen just above the hip bone. Two of his men had loaded their muskets and came to the aid of their Captain, firing at the enemy soldiers attacking him. With this the redcoats ceased their assault; some ran away, some surrendered. The rest of the American force now entered the redoubt without opposition. The redoubt was taken in ten minutes. Lafayette praised very well known personages for their performance in the assault, but made only a cursory reference to Olney -- a situation occuring in all wars where the wrong people get the credit. Afterward, Gimete, the French officer, visited Onley in the hospital to say that Lafayette needed to rectify his omission; but the veteran Continental answered, "Let it go, the day is past." It was eventually brought to Washington's attention and the Rhode Island flag was ordered to be flown above the Redoubt through to the surrender a few days later.

Assault on Redoubt #10

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Virginia
AND THE GUNS FELL SILENT
OCTOBER 1781
36x36
Giclée  14.5x14.5
In October at Yorktown, a young British drummer boy was ordered to the parapet to beat the call for a parley. No one knows the boy's name nor where he stood when the guns fell silent as he began to beat his drum. Behind him followed a British officer waving a white handkerchief, thus signalling, for all practical purposes, the end of the American Revolution.

And The Guns Fell Silent

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New York
ARREST OF ROCHAMBEAU
OCTOBER 22, 1782
36x36
Sold to Hudson River Valley Institute as part of Dr. Frank P. Bumpus Collection
Giclée  14.5x14.5
In October of 1782, while leaving King's Ferry on the Hudson, Rochambeau was approached by a local sheriff who presented a warrant for his arrest. The complaint against Rochambeau originated when French troops under Rochambeau's command, on their way to Yorktown a year earlier, had cut wood on land belonging to an American militia captain. The sheriff explained that he was aware of what the General had done for his country, but that he must do his duty. He then placed his hand on Rochambeau's shoulder and said, "You are my prisoner." Rochambeau, surrounded by 5,000 French troops, replied "Take me if you can."

Arrest of Rochambeau

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Connecticut
FRENCH ARMY ENCAMPMENT AT EAST HARTFORD
OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1782
36x96
Giclée  32.8x12
With Hartford in the distance, Rochambeau on horseback surveys all the regiments of his army.

French Army Encampment at East Hartford, October-November 1782

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Paris, France
SIGNING OF THE TREATY OF PARIS
SEPTEMBER 3, 1783
David Wagner's version of American Artist Benjamin West's unfinished painting.
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Signing of Treaty of Paris

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David R. Wagner -- New England Historical Artist

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